Monday, February 1, 2010

Follow Up to Whole Brain Teaching

I got such passionate responses (both negative and positive) from readers of this blog and especially  my colleagues here at the Scottish Rite Clinic that I think if might be interesting to continue the discussion. I thought I would link a video of the system being used in a Kindergarten class where there is a slightly more natural interaction style and it is easier to imagine how a real class would respond to this style.

My feeling, however, is that some teachers and students would love this system and some would hate it and not very many would be neutral about it. Another important issue, of course, is whether it would work with any particular child with ASD with appropriate modifications. Would it be better or worse than other teaching styles?


6 comments:

Liz Ditz said...

I got intrigued. It's like Direct Instruction in some ways

http://www.nifdi.org/15/

and

http://www.nifdi.org/15/.

More on Whole Brain Teaching (Power Teaching) from its website, http://powerteachers.net/ and Chris Biffle's YouTube Channel,

http://www.youtube.com/user/ChrisBiffle.

Smarticus said...

Don't use powerteachers.net. The accurate current site is http://wholebrainteaching.com.

Smarticus said...

Don't use powerteachers.net. The accurate current site is http://wholebrainteaching.com.

Smarticus said...

Don't use powerteachers.net. The accurate current site is http://wholebrainteaching.com.

Karyn said...

One of the goals of working with children with Autism is to get them to be responsive to more than one cue. Using visuals, as well as language, as well as having them move with the gestures, would surely help them with that. Lots of kids learn better while moving and having fun and this seems to do both. Also having them learn to imitate the way you say the words would keep them paying attention to tone of voice, and appropriate volume. Even if the whole approach wasn't used there are definitely tools we can use.

Anonymous said...

I don't see this method being helpful to students with classic autism. Possibly high functioning autism or Aspergers. Any one seen this done with more severe disabilities?